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sightseeing

This tag is associated with 56 posts

Vitis vinifera…

Life in Chile has been chugging along at a leisurely pace, with me working during the week and thoroughly enjoying my weekends. Recently, I had a welcome bit of excitement in an otherwise mundane work week when I discovered my boss was in town. He knew I was working abroad, but didn’t know where, and … Continue reading

Of hiccups and new routines…

As I’ve often said, travel—with all of its new discoveries and exciting adventures—is also a challenge. While we were in Valparaiso about to go on a day trip to explore Casablanca Valley wines, I discovered that I left my ATM card in San Esteban at the last ATM we used. I was distracted while using … Continue reading

Feeling the Dieciocho vibe…

After all the activity of the ski portion of our trip, I was ready to relax a bit, and Valparaiso is perfectly suited for slowing down and taking things in. Valparaiso, a port city, is considered the “cultural capitol” of Chile for good reason. It’s made up of a flat part along the port, then … Continue reading

The mountains are calling…

Up until now, I’ve used my weekends to play tourist, eagerly leaving the big, cacophonous city to encounter something quieter and more laid back. “Cacophony” in a large South American city is not like what you’d hear in a similarly sized city back home. Here, it’s the multilayered din of grid-locked cars honking because they … Continue reading

The Salar de Uyuni

To take full advantage of my recent three-day weekend, I took a double-decker overnight bus to Uyuni, which is in the southwest corner of Bolivia. Uyuni itself is a small, sleepy sort of town, most known for being the gateway to the Salar de Uyuni (“salar” meaning “salt flat”), which is the world’s largest salt … Continue reading

Trekking to the Lost City (Ciudad Perdida)

The Lost City, or Ciudad Perdida, is an ancient city in the Sierra Nevadas that is believed to have been built 650 years before Machu Picchu (around 800 CE) by the Tairona, the ancient ancestors of the area’s current tribes: the Kogis, the Wiwa, and the Arhuacas. It was “found” again in 1972 when treasure … Continue reading

Cartagena, the jewel of the Caribbean…

After Villa de Leyva, we all flew to Cartagena, whose old town is a Unesco World Heritage site for its well-preserved Murallas, or stone walls that were originally built in the 16th century to protect the city against marauders. Within the walls is a charming mix of narrow roads, vibrantly painted stone buildings in shades … Continue reading

War and peace

In the 90s, when I was much younger and dreaming of all the places that I would travel to one day, I remember someone asking me if there was a place I wouldn’t go. I didn’t hesitate in my reply: Colombia. Back then, it was considered one of the most violent countries in the world with … Continue reading

Of dust, deities, and trekking…

I’ve returned to Kathmandu and things seem back to normal here (to the untrained eye, anyway)—it’s just as loud and chaotic as when I first got here. It’s also very dusty. Face masks are popular in many Asian countries, but in places like Taiwan they’re mostly used for the purpose of protecting others when one … Continue reading

Limestone, water, and time…

Yesterday we took a refreshing day trip to Yeliu, a fishing town in the north that was a refreshing reprieve from the bustling city of Taipei. Aside from fishing, Yeliu is most known for Yeliu Geological Park—a site with interesting limestone rock formations that were created by the eroding powers of water and time. I … Continue reading

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